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20130126
20130203
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KQED (PBS) 38
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English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
make a difference, john, but i think she handled herself extremely well. there are three questions. why was security not provided despite the pleas. why was help not sent to these guys over seven hours of attacks, and what is responsible for the massive cover-up and fake stories about this video, anti-muslim video. she said to the third, i had nothing to do with the talking points, nothing to do with the military, i take responsibility for the lack of security. however, all these memos and cables that came, they all didn't come into my office personally, but i take responsibility. i think she handled it well, john. and the issue i think is pretty much gone now, and the republicans did it not succeed in what they were trying to cue. >> how would you describe hillary clinton at the house and the senate hearings? what kind of an adjective would you use? >> i would say she was commanding, i would say she was presidential. she came across very much as someone who is shouldering responsibility but she also avoided taking any of the blame. that was a very good balancing act, and she handled al
'dell, of venturebeat.com. as well as john myers, kxtv political editor joining us from sacramento. governor jerry brown struck a confident tone on thursday, applauding lawmakers and voters for making tough decisions to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lo
. gwen: john mccain was not talking to be population. he was talking about hispanic voters. karen, forgive me. 2007 sounds like an echo of some place we've been before. >> yeah, the things that people are talking about now -- enhanced security on the border. cracking down on hiring of illegal immigrants, a legalization program, all of those things were actually done, written into the law in 1986 and i looked back and looked at the signing ceremony where president reagan declareed that future generations of americans will be faithful for our efforts to humanely regain control of our boarders. that law -- borders. that law, the last immigration reform that this country attempted actually left the country the exact same problems it had then, only worse. back then there are three million to five million illegal immigrants. now there are 1 1. rather than settling this question of who gets to be an american, it's now more enflamed than it has been in memory and it's in part because of that law and its failures that i think we are where we are today. >> as i understand it, the decree tea
of abc news, jeanne cummings of bloomberg news, and john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger. before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential, additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation. the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. president barack obama returned to the west front of the capitol to take the oath of office on monday. four years older, grayer and
was a safety for john gagleardi, the winningest coach in college football history. >> i knew we have some trivia. >> actually, many cornerbacks were also chiefs of staff. >> he, as my colleague peter baker said, it's stirred, not shakenment so he is has not taken new people from outside. >> i mean i said a new team but it's almost -- >> it's all the same people, just in different chairs. and a lot of people got promoted, some people like quitener left. but we know o booma by now. he does not like to bring in fwrerb blood. he likes people he trust, he likes people like mcdonough who would throw themselves on a grain aid for them, extremely loyal, trustworthy and they are to the going to leak. so he sticks with those people. and he's been doing since he became president. as for his term, i sort of thing he is in danger through no fault of his own or only halfway of really wasting these which-- few months, precious months of the second term on budget. i think we're going have a bunch of squabbles. the chance of us getting tax reform are mines call. so well he probably find a mediocre fix for
million gallons of oil into the sea. senator john kerry of massachusetts was confirmed today to be secretary of state. the vote was 94-3, as the five- term democrat won the overwhelming approval of his colleagues. kerry is 69, and a former democratic presidential nominee. senators from both sides praised him in a rare show of bipartisan support. john has already built strong relationships with leaders across the world. which will allow him to step seamlessly into the role of secretary of state. >> i don't know of anybody who has led the life that has been more oriented towards ultimately being secretary of state than john kerry. >> sreenivasan: kerry has been an unofficial envoy for the obama administration in recent years. he will succeed hillary clinton, who is stepping down after serving as secretary of state since 2009. in egypt, the army chief warned the country's political crisis could lead to the "collapse" of the state. general abdel-fattah el-sisi issued the warning as protests and violence extended into a sixth day. in port said, thousands of people marched in funer
career. >> rose: the other point you made is john harbaugh changed the team during mid-season. he took the defense apart. >> you know, it's amazing to me. coaches a lot of times -- i remember, there was three weeks left in the regular season when john harbaugh chose to fire his offensive coordinator cam cameron and replace him with jim caldwell. and what is amazing to me is that cameron had been there for five years and a lot of coachs if they see a dysfunctional situation for whatever reason will just say "okay. we'll change this in the off season. it's too embarrassing to change it now." >> rose: not harbaugh. >> both of these harbaughs did something late in the year that appeared to be stupid. one changed quarter backs and, you know, jim harbaugh chains quarterbacks from the highest rated passer in the n.f.l. to an unproven guy, this colin kaepernick, this stallion that we're talking about and the other one change to the offensive coordinator with three weeks left. that was a little bit more understandable because a lot of the players had been chafing at the offense that they had be
's successor, former massachusetts senator john kerry, was sworn in at a private ceremony this afternoon and starts work monday. for more on hillary clinton's legacy, we turn to two long-time foreign policy watchers. trudy rubin is the worldview columnist at the "philadelphia inquirer"; and susan glasser is executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. >> well, trudy rubin, you heard the president just a moment ago say that hillary clinton was a great success as secretary of state, was she? >> i think it depends on how you define great success. if you are's talking about implementing his policy os within the confines of the policy, then she did a good job overseas, carrying out his ideas and making a terrific impression when she did public diplomacy. because she's such a talented politician, even overseas. but if it comes to signature achievements, either any big achievement under obama's policy, negotiation on middle east peace, or syria, on solving still existing issues in afghanistan and pakistan, apart from the pullout, or any doctrine of her own or signature issue of her own, i don
to pick up cheap stocks. he's john rogers, founder and chief investment officer of ariel investments and its flagship ariel mutual fund has tripled in value since march 2009. john, this is the first time you are our market monitor, so welcome to "nightly business report." let me begin by asking you, here we've got the stock market at these new levels. why do you think this momentum is going to continue? >> well, as we talked to companies all around the country, we continue to hear that, you know, we're only in the fourth or fifth inning of this recovery. we have a long, long way to go. we're going to have earnings and profitability will be higher as we move into 2013 and 2014. there's so much cash around that people can buy back stock and that's going to help earnings. so we're extraordinarily bullish today. >> susie: what about individual investors? as you know well, they have been very fearful of investing in stocks. is it too late for the individual to get in at this point? >> i don't think so. p.e. multiples are stillest. thes & p, around 13 times. i think people have been too ca
. at least for now. >> and hillary clinton as i successor, john kerry, was sworn in just a short time ago. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, he was the man never afraid to speak his mind. tonight we look back on the life of ed koch and his lasting impact on new york city. in mexico city, authorities are promising a farrer investigation after 32 people were killed in a blast at mexico's state-owned oil company. >> the blast took place at the worst possible moment. in the middle of the afternoon, just as shifts were changing. workers at the state-run energy giant who were in the lobby were caught up in the explosion whicher to through the ground floor -- which tore through the ground floor. emergency services were quickly on the scene and the red cross attended to many of the injured -- injured outside the building. others were taken to nearby hospitals. as the building was evacuated, it soon became clear that the blast had caused significant loss of life and damage. >> we saw the explosion and all the windows in the tower came down. it was very s
. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. like just about everyone else, i enjoy a good show, and the inauguration of a president is one of those spectacles of democracy that can make us remember we're part of something big and enduring. so for a few hours this past monday, the pomp and circumstance inspired us to think government of, by, and for the people really is just that, despite the predatory threats that stalk it. unfortunately, the mood didn't last. so help me, every now and then, as the cameras panned upward to that great dome towering above the ceremony, i was reminded of something the good feeling of the moment could not erase. it's the journalists' curse to have a
worked pretty well as a way of interrupting what is going on in the world. and when my editor john meacham, he left "newsweek" and went to random house and i said wow-- . >> rose: moved back to nashville, by the way. >> yeah, after, in the course of this whole project, he and his wife, and he had made that plan. and i thought it would be fun to have an editor like john. and it really caused me to think well, maybe i will turn this into a book. and the last two years i have really dug into it. i moved all the furniture out of my living room in nashville, i put up giant white boards, had directed research, 15,000 pages worth. and here's what i lirnle lirnled-- learned, charlie. >> we'll talk chap per-- chapter by chapter. >> more death, but there has never been a time in human history when we've had so many truly revolutionary changes going on simultaneously. the genetic revolution. we're crossing the boundaries between species slicing genes, enhancing human traits, selecting traits, curing diseases. the digital and commuter revolution which is completely transforming the way we rela
're wonderful that way but anyway did that film. the cinematographer was john deboarman and we would talk shots during the movies. you sound like you should be directingment and i said find me something. because it is called show business. and even if you are, you know, famous as an actor for years, they don't send you scripts as a director until you've proven yourself. so i, very rarely got, and unless they needed you as a star okay we'll let you direct. >> so what happened with this, the cinematography worked on the film you and empty-- emma thompson. you said i would like to look for something, he knew the producer. >> he worked for the producer when he worked, two directors had been with this project quartet. they fell out. that is the only way i get offered somethingness. >> rose: somebody gets fired. >> two people get fired. so-- so the day before i catch the plane to am could back to los angeles from london he calls mement and he says i've got a script. and he sent it and i read it on the airplane. and it moved me but i would have-- . >> rose: moved you, you were crying. your poor wife l
victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. >> ifill: mccain also said the country cannot continue to deny citizenship to children brought to the u.s. illegally. president obama has said immigration reform is at the top of his second term agenda. today his spokesman jay carney welcomed the senate agreement. >> this is a big deal. this is an important development. this is in keeping with the principles the president has been espousing for a long time, in keeping with bipartisan efforts in the past, and with the effort this president believes has to end in a law that he can sign. >> ifill: mr. obama is scheduled to unveil his own ideas on immigration reform tomorrow in las vegas. >> woodruff: so how will the politics of this new effort shake out on capitol h
. >> holman: john kerry gave his a rare storm blasted into the southeast killing two people. in georgia, an enormous funnel cloud struck cartersville and downtown adairsville 60 miles northwest of atlanta. it tore up homes, heavily damaged a large factory and flipped big trucks on their sides. another tornado did damage in mount juliet, tennessee. the storms rupted as a large warm air mass out of the gulf collidecollided with an incomind front. john kerry gave his farewell speech on the floor of the u.s. senate today. the veteran democrat is leaving, after 27 years, to become secretary of state. today, kerry looked back on his public career, starting with his service in vietnam and as a leading anti-war figure. in the senate, he focused on foreign policy, and was his party's nominee for president in 2004. >> eight years ago, i admit i had a slightly different plan to leave the senate. but 61 million americans voted they want me to stay with you. staying here, i learned about humility, and i learned sometimes the greatest lesson comes not from victory, but from dusting yourself off. >> h
got standing room only tickets. we sat in the aisle, two rows from the top, just in time to watch john gillium, famous down here in new orleans, return the opening kickoff, 94 yards for a touchdown. at that point i was hopelessly in love with the nfl. had no idea that i would one day be calling the nfl or that i would am could be ba and have a chance to call a super bowl here in new orleans. >> rose: we conclude with an owner's perspective on the nfl, robert kraft of the new england patriots. >> my philosophy in any of our business to get the best people we can get. that doesn't mean the person i might choose might not be right for you. but it is right for us. and i have to feel that i can build a relationship with key managers. and if i can't, then we usually don't do it. and they don't teach this stuff at harvard business school. i mean it's just something you mel and you feel and it's right or it isn't right. >> rose: a program note, more of my conversations about new orleanses with james carville, mary matalin and julia reed will be seen next week. tonight, the city and the game wh
brought down john gotti, the head of the gambino crime syndicate and brought to justice the terrorists responsible for bombing the world trade center and embassies in africa. i would say that is a pretty good run. you do not want to mess with mary jo. >> mary jo white, the new selection for the head of the sec. president obama also nominated richard cordray to the head of the consumer protection financial bureau. >> this is a message consistent with what the president has said, this is who i am, these are the people who will best carry out policies in my judgment that i think is necessary to clean up this country and make sure that we do not go through it again. challenging the senate to act and accept or confirm richard cordray and mary jo white to do its constitutional duty. >> good choices, bad choices, colby, a senior banking experience? >> based on my experience as a friend who was a former prosecutor in new york and knows mary jo white, an excellent choice. she will faithfully fulfilled a lot. >> as far as i can tell, this woman may be sleeps 3 hours a night. she ran this huge pr
. >> this conflict and syria is going to be one of the most pressing problems waiting for senator john kerry as he takes over as secretary of state. today, his colleagues of a woman reconfirm him to succeed hillary clinton. before she goes, a secretary clinton sat down with our state department correspondent. >> what i believe is that the u.s. has played an indefensible role in working to help establish an opposition coalition, something that is very important as we found in libya, which was not being accomplished until the u.s. played a much greater role in helping to bring that out. channeling humanitarian aid. the president has announced more aid which brings our total to the highest in the world. this will go to organizations that rightly have to work with the assad regime. >> >> we will bring you more of that as soon as we can. the army chief is warning that the current protests could lead to the collapse of the state and threaten future generations. that assessment comes after days of fighting that claimed at least 50 lives. the army has been deployed in three cities along the suez canal alt
questioning about his job. there was questioning by john mccain about the surge in iraq. >> or you correct or incorrect when you say it -- when you said that the search would be the most dangerous foreign-policy disaster sense the non? the question is right or wrong. i would like the answer of whether you are right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> let the record show that you refused to answer the question. >> if you would like me to explain, -- >> i actually would like an answer. >> what else did we learn from today's hearing a short time ago? he did not do the best job of defending himself. >> no, it was a fractious hearing and pointless. he referred to the government of iran as legitimately elected. he apologized for saying that israel had arranged a slaughter of its enemies. he was defending his views on iran. on israel, they think he is not friendly enough. in the end, i don't think we learned a lot about him, really. in the past, he had expressed traditionally dovish liberal foreign policy positions even though he used t
each other in the game. john harbaugh for the ravens. jim harbaugh for the 49ers. and their mom and dad are here, too. jack and jackie harbaugh. and the big question is, where a the mom and dad are going to watch the game on sunday. the two teams played last year against each other on thanksgiving day. their mom and dad watched from an office inside the stadium. they didn't want to be in the stadium. they didn't want tv cameras to catch their reactions. in speaking with them, you know, they say they're kind of numb during the game. the brothers have a joint press conference today and were pretty funny because they all kept agreeing with each other about their philosophy of football. and they're trying to make this not so much about them, but let's face it, this is a great story. you know? and it was really funny after that press conference, i saw jack harbaugh, their dad, walking down the street and people didn't recognize him, but he'd see a guy with a 49er shirt on, he'd go, go 49ers. next block he'd see someone with a baltimore shirt on, say, go ravens. he was trying to be enthusiast
friend, arizona senator john mccain made clear, they haven't forgotten. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous. >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like an answer on whether you were right or wrong, then you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> well let the record show that you refused to answer the question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you'd like me to explain why ... >> i'd actually like an answer, yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that, as i've already said. my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. as to the comment i made about >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir, and you're on the wrong side of it. and your
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)